Heather Fletcher

Heather Fletcher

Heather Fletcher is senior content editor with Target Marketing.

Google Links Ads to Brick-and-Mortar Sales

Many marketers had their doubts about whether digital ads were worth the money they were paying, because they didn’t have the “last click” of the brick-and-mortar sale. Now, Google is linking that sale to the ad touchpoint, the search giant revealed last Tuesday. “Attribution” isn’t exactly a sexy term to marketers, but “sales,” “revenue” and…

Budgeting in Uncertain Times

One of the scariest phrases a magazine publisher will ever utter about a budget is, "I don't know." But more and more publishers are becoming comfortable with those words for 2010.

Boost Event Revenue: 10 Tips From the Pros

In July, following its Open Government & Innovations (OGI) Conference in Washington, D.C., Falls Church, Va.-based 1105 Government Information Group wanted to keep the event's momentum going. The event had been tweeted about 4,423 times, making the conference's hashtag, "#ogi," the No. 4 trending topic on Twitter during the event. So, 1105 decided to create a "TweetBook"—a compilation (in PDF format) of all the tweets—which conference attendees could download from the OGI Web site after the event.

Finding Success at The Source

In August 2008, at a time when many magazines were folding, L. Londell McMillan—an entertainment lawyer, real estate developer and part owner of the New Jersey Nets—snapped up the ailing brand The Source with plans to revamp the New York-based "Bible of Hip-Hop Music, Culture and Politics." He went to work quickly. By December, McMillan's efforts had won back major advertisers such as Sony, Warner Music Group, the Army and the Navy. In February, the magazine announced that it had eliminated $3.75 million in outstanding debt—a sum that McMillan, who is co-owner and executive publisher of The Source, personally secured in financing to free the brand from this burden.

Forbes' iConferences Are Sticky: Virtually and in Reality

For anyone who's been to a real trade show, virtual trade shows look much the same. The speakers are there, the booths, the sponsors—it's just missing the three dimensions that come with a plane fare. That's the premise that Forbes is working on. And the New York-based media empire is finding that, indeed, its iConferences are working.