Open Enrollment | Subscribe to Publishing Executive HERE
Connect
Follow us on
Advertisement
 
Linda Ruth

Publishers' Dojo

By Linda Ruth

About Linda

Linda Ruth is president & CEO of Publishing Dojo. She offers advice on the keys to marketing at retail and online. She is one of the original founders of Exceptional Women Publishing and Women in Digital Media and a current board member. Linda also is president of Newsstands of America, the coop of independent booksellers. She has more than 20 years' experience in magazine marketing, and has held management positions at McGraw-Hill and IDG Communications. Her books, “Internet Marketing for Magazine Publishers,” “Secrets of SEO for Publishers,” and “How to Market your Newsstand Magazine” can be found at Amazon.com. She can be found on the internet at:
www.magazinedojo.com
www.twitter.com/Linda_Ruth
 

Media Vent

Bob Sacks
Like the Ad Industry, Publishing is Often a Load of Bull
Oct 14, 2014

My Goodness, Rance Crain wrote a terrific, important and timely article directed for the advertising world. And it is just as meaningful...



Industry Insiders

The Insiders
Streamlining Digital Ad Workflows: What Every CRO Should Know About Implementing an Order Management System
Oct 8, 2014

Over the past few years, publishers have seen their ad inventory grow exponentially with the explosion of digital and mobile...



B2B Beat

Andy Kowl
The Impact of LinkedIn Buying Bizo
Aug 12, 2014

If B2B publishing was a different industry, the prospect of LinkedIn buying Bizowould invite anti-trust scrutiny. Just think about what might...



The Digital Market

Thea Selby
Top 5 Mobile Trends for Publishers—It’s Good News, Folks
Jul 7, 2014

Mary Meeker of Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers is one of my s/heroes. In this day and age of branded...



Pub Talk

Denis Wilson
Facebook Co-Founder and New Republic Publisher Chris Hughes: Why Print is the ‘Crown Jewel’ of the Business
Jun 4, 2014

Last month I had the chance to attend the Adobe Digital Symposium in New York. Much of sessions focused on...



Publisher's Paradox

Andrew Davis
Publisher’s Paradox: Your Newsletter Subscribers Are Being Overfed
Apr 28, 2014

Charlie Magazine, based in Charleston, South Carolina, isn't asking its readers to subscribe to everything. Instead, Charlie is inviting readers...



Profit from Publishing!

Thaddeus B. Kubis
Media Conference Exhibitors Should Go Deeper to Engage
Oct 9, 2013

It has been a few weeks since I attended (as the guest of the event organizer) the Publishing Business Conference...



The Balance Between Local and Regional Publishing

 
Some of the most venerable magazines still in print in the US are the super-regionals. These are those grand old publications that speak to a character of a region and of the people who live there; those magazines that reflect that character to the greater demographic and, through their editorial provide an image around which their readers cohere. These magazines are known to all of us, regardless of which region in which we live: Sunset. Southern Living. Midwest Living. And of course, in New England, the three-quarters of a century old Yankee magazine.

A few years ago, when, despite our industry’s chronic pessimism, enthusiasm for regional publishing was at its height, I looked more deeply into the trends that were leading the growth of this publishing category. I discovered them to reflect those of the publishing industry in general: a movement away from general interest content and increasingly in the direction of special interest and niche content. As pet magazines may be succeeded by dog magazines and then sometimes breed-specific magazines, so regional magazines have become increasingly local and topic-specific, following the interests of the audience and the advertising dollars.

This trend has been reflected in the trend of regional magazine launches, away from the editorial- and audience- based lifestyle magazines that help define a region for those who live in it and love it, and towards the increasingly narrowly focused city and regional magazines speaking to a much smaller geographic area and very vertical content: New Hampshire Business. New Hampshire Bride. New Hampshire Home.

The regional publications, to keep their publications strong, have needed to find ways of balancing the local interest of their advertising base with their broader base of readers and their broader content interests. Some publications have done so with the use of many sub-regional editions, each catering to a specific niche or a specific city or locality within a region.

Yankee has risen to the challenge with the purchase of McLean, the publishers of the New Hampshire magazines mentioned above. The addition of the McLean portfolio fills specific advertising-driven niches that will add to the revenue streams of the reader-driven Yankee cannot reach. Between the two companies the range of publications represents the spectrum of the challenges and opportunities faced by our country's remaining regional publishing companies.

Companies Mentioned:

COMMENTS

Click here to leave a comment...
Comment *
Most Recent Comments: