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Wanted- Digital Ads Addendum
January 1, 1998

Shifting over to a RIP-once digital workflow involved a great deal of training at PC World: Bringing RIPping and proofing in-house meant that Linda Manes Goodwin, vice president of manufacturing for PC World Communications, San Francisco, and her staff had to learn to handle tasks such as preflighting, PostScripting, RIPping and proofing files. Manes Goodwin is convinced that computer-to-plate printing is where the industry is headed because it improves quality. While her determination is one factor driving her conversion forward, she also points out that she has felt able to achieve it because of the competence of her staff—especially in working with computers and software.

Wanted- Digital Ads
January 1, 1998

Linda Manes Goodwin, vice president of manufacturing for PC World Communications, San Francisco, has become a CTP crusader, speaking at recent industry events about her own efforts to implement CTP printing with her magazine, PC World, and actively soliciting digital ads from PC World's advertisers. Linda Manes Goodwin, vice president of manufacturing for PC World Communications, San Francisco, had been watching the industry's progress with computer-to-plate (CTP) printing, and saw no reason to wait before forging ahead with it. So she asked her printer, Brown Printing, Waseca, MN, to tell her what it would take. Why do you want to go CTP? Brown wanted to

6 Things Digital Natives Should Know About Print
December 31, 1969 at 7:00 pm

With several prominent web sites launching magazines, Newsweek starting to rise from the ashes, and many titles seeing increased ad pages, 2013 was the year print forgot to die. It was the year our industry seemed to reach consensus that, for many years to come, we will derive much of our profit from putting ink on paper.

Why Web-Forward Media Companies Are Turning To Print
December 31, 1969 at 7:00 pm

There has been plenty of press lately about online properties going print. It’s hard not to be drawn into these stories and see them as silver linings after a year of “print is dead” hysteria. However, these launches, though encouraging, are less a bellwether for the health of the publishing industry and more of a reminder of what makes magazines valuable to begin with.