Content Strategy

Elsevier Slips into Something a Little More Customized
June 1, 2004

The publishing giant strives to provide more timely, relevant products. &012;In 1996, the system that housed the content for "Mosby's Drug Consult," the best-selling drug reference published by Elsevier's Health Sciences division, was cutting edge. But eight years is a long time in terms of technology, and it was clear to everyone who worked with the system that it was time for something new. Elsevier staff wanted to be able to slice and dice the content to create new products or to provide customized content on demand. The editorial, production and business-development staff knew that drug information data was being authored, edited and

Pearson Wants Access
June 1, 2004

There's no question that digital asset management (DAM) systems have emerged as the cornerstone of many publishers' forward-looking growth strategies. As more and more publishers rely on multichannel publishing to multiple formats, markets and distribution channels, this becomes even more true.And most often, as in the case of Pearson Education, going the way of a…

Managing Partners on the Network
April 1, 2004

Ten years ago, everyone thought the concept of using a managed network service to deliver files to printing partners was a good one. But since the Internet took off these same people think they can just get a secure firewall with some 128-bit security software, and it'll be much cheaper. The rumor of managed networks' death has been greatly exaggerated. They remain a viable method of file delivery and storage—and there's a long list of printers and publishers to prove it. These organizations understand the benefits of a managed network service are cost-effectiveness, greater security, access to a community of interest, and more efficient workflows. For

10 Pitfalls of the DAM'd
April 1, 2004

Digital asset management projects do not figure in the long and inglorious history of failed information technology projects as often as ERP (enterprise resource planning) and CRM (customer relationship management) initiatives; they are typically smaller in scale. But failures exist. There are many ways to get a DAM (digital asset management) project wrong, and only one way to get it right. By 'getting it right', we mean that the organization enjoys a reasonable return on its investment within a year of going live. Here are some pitfalls we have run into over the past decade: 1. Project scope is too broad. Choose a high-value and well-bounded problem,

Pulling It All Together
October 17, 2003

Seeking to enhance its digital asset management and workflow solution offerings, R.R. Donnelley recently launched three products as part of its MediaCompass tool set. MediaCompass pulls together production teams and helps them collaborate and instantly share critical content and color information. StudioStream, one of the three new offerings included in MediaCompass, improves the workflow for digital photographers, and allows art directors to view high-resolution photography online, company officials say. ShareStream, Donnelley's SWOP-certified soft-proofing solution, allows online approvals of creative concepts, page edits, color retouching, and final page inspection. Completing a two-year beta test, Donnelley unleashed Digital Swatch Match, the third of the new

DAM Simple Imaging
August 1, 2003

While the Internet has made personal and business communications faster, it's also made life more complicated for publishers, catalogers, magazines, ad agencies, and corporate graphics departments. With everyone from Web designers to CEOs to printers requiring images in different formats for different purposes, corporate publishers are finding it hard to enforce company and brand identities. Logos and other brand images featured on letterheads and envelopes should match those used on signage, magazine ads, the Web, HTML e-mails, presentations, billboards, other printed materials, and television. Usually, this requires organizations to manage dozens of digital graphic files for each corporate logo or brand image. Every logo,

DAM Simple Imaging
August 1, 2003

While the Internet has made personal and business communications faster, it's also made life more complicated for publishers, catalogers, magazines, ad agencies, and corporate graphics departments. With everyone from Web designers to CEOs to printers requiring images in different formats for different purposes, corporate publishers are finding it hard to enforce company and brand identities. Logos and other brand images featured on letterheads and envelopes should match those used on signage, magazine ads, the Web, HTML e-mails, presentations, billboards, other printed materials, and television. Usually, this requires organizations to manage dozens of digital graphic files for each corporate logo or brand image. Every logo,

Buying a Content Management System
March 1, 2003

Yogi Berra once said, "When you come to a fork in the road, take it." We all know you can't go down two paths at once, but choosing can be hard, especially if you're a publisher talking about whether to buy or to build a content management system. Most publishers who end up building a solution say to themselves more than once, "I know other publishers have done this before, so why do we have to build from the ground up?" And most publishers that buy a product at some point say, "We're doing so much customization, we might as well have started from scratch-and we still

Where's My Stuff?
March 8, 2002

"There's the looming prevalence of reasonably inexpensive DVD media and somewhat inexpensive writers," notes Vince Naselli, director of TrendWatch Graphic Arts, a research company that specializes in the assessment of trends in the graphic communications market. By providing timely and strategic information, Naselli's group harnesses some of the most hard-hitting market analysis in the business. This time, digital asset management goes under the gun. In TrendWatch's latest report, "Storage Media: Where's My Stuff?," Naselli indicates an increasing acceptance of DVDs as a storage medium--especially for archiving purposes among graphic arts professionals. A simple search on Yahoo! indicates that dozens of companies are providing

For Non-Profit's Sake
January 18, 2002

The definition of "interaction" has evolved over the past few years with increasing momentum being directed toward Internet-related technology. At one time, to be considered an outreaching association, it was enough to send memos or manage meetings. But that was then. Today, an association's mobility depends greatly on how it uses the Internet to court new members and spread news. Within the publishing industry, nothing could be more accurate when standardization is among the most often discussed subject among production managers intent on making the most of their workflow. Recently, Printable Technologies shed light on how digitization is the tie that binds cross-media