Horizon Paper Co.

Trends to Track in the Paper Market
June 1, 2006

The publishing industry has changed dramatically in every area, from the way pages are created to virtual proofing to computer-controlled presses to highly sophisticated finishing equipment. Even paper, the low-tech part of our industry, has changed. How has paper been affected in this highly technical world we work in, and how have those changes affected the way we use paper to produce magazines and catalogs? In my opinion, there have been four distinct areas of notable change. Paper Characteristics Paper specifications have been slowly changing toward more “hybrid” options. The standards of grading papers, e.g., #2, #3, #4, etc., have blurred—papers are

Trends to Track in the Paper Market
June 1, 2006

The publishing industry has changed dramatically in every area, from the way pages are created to virtual proofing to computer-controlled presses to highly sophisticated finishing equipment. Even paper, the low-tech part of our industry, has changed. How has paper been affected in this highly technical world we work in, and how have those changes affected the way we use paper to produce magazines and catalogs? In my opinion, there have been four distinct areas of notable change. Paper Characteristics Paper specifications have been slowly changing toward more “hybrid” options. The standards of grading papers, e.g., #2, #3, #4, etc., have blurred—papers are

The Changing of Standards
August 1, 2005

The change has been subtle. It’s an unpopular trend with most book publishers, even those who’ve elected to do it. So far consumers/readers haven’t really noticed, and that’s the idea. But the educated guess is that someday they will. The trend I’m referring to is the encroachment of uncoated groundwood stocks into the pure realm of hardcover, case-bound books. Unlike magazines, catalogs and newspapers, books are meant to have a long shelf life. Historically, they have been printed on uncoated freesheets, but lately the industry appears to be graduating to newer, brighter groundwood stocks that look and feel very similar to freesheets, but offer

Graphic Arts Industry Supports Fund-Raising Effort
January 1, 2005

The graphic arts industry has helped to contribute some $350,000 toward research and awareness of Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome, through an annual Bounty of Hope Dinner and Silent Auction. The event—the only national fund-raising effort for the cause—is organized by Betty Maul, president of FrontEnd Graphics, whose daughter has been diagnosed with the neurologic syndrome. Held Nov. 4 at the Union League Club in New York City, the event was led by Nick Warnock, a contestant on last season's reality show "The Apprentice," who served as master of ceremonies. The following companies participated as corporate sponsors and donators to the silent auction: Brown Printing,

The Ethical Expert-Jack Grabber
October 1, 1998

Jack Graber's professional integrity, technical know-how and commitment to cataloging have left an indelible impression. "I've never heard anyone say a bad word about Jack Graber—and I've known him for more than 20 years," attests Michael Carton, director of catalog production for Bloomingdale's By Mail, New York City. "First and foremost, Jack is a consummate professional. Not only is he knowledgeable about all aspects of print and management, but he's a great mentor and trainer. Any person with a production-related problem can look to him for help." Indeed, Graber has earned a reputation as a catalog industry innovator, educator and ambassador. On the job,