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Marshall Cavendish Rocks the International Market
October 1, 2004

If there's any question of the impact evolving technologies can have on the modern publishing company, at least one publisher has a tale that might help tip the scales. A recent 52-part "Speak English" series for the Russian market could have presented major challenges to the team at Marshall Cavendish, publisher of books, directories, magazines and partworks (series), whose brands include Marshall Cavendish Reference, Benchmark Books, Cavendish Children's Books, Federal-Marshall Cavendish Education and Times Editions-Marshall Cavendish. Each book in the "Speak English" series was being developed and "packaged" by language-teaching experts in the United Kingdom, translated in the Ukraine, produced in Poland and

Marshall Cavendish Rocks the International Market
October 1, 2004

If there's any question of the impact evolving technologies can have on the modern publishing company, at least one publisher has a tale that might help tip the scales. A recent 52-part "Speak English" series for the Russian market could have presented major challenges to the team at Marshall Cavendish, publisher of books, directories, magazines and partworks (series), whose brands include Marshall Cavendish Reference, Benchmark Books, Cavendish Children's Books, Federal-Marshall Cavendish Education and Times Editions-Marshall Cavendish. Each book in the "Speak English" series was being developed and "packaged" by language-teaching experts in the United Kingdom, translated in the Ukraine, produced in Poland

Reprints Gain Clout As Profit-Pushers
August 1, 2004

For years, publishers have treated reprints like a shy little cousin—always invited to the party, but never a big part of the conversation. In today's digital world, however, reprints are bringing in the bucks, earning them a seat at the big people's table. Reprints have, for the most part, long been a profitable part of business for most publishers. But, today, moving from analog to digital files that can be easily customized, shared and tracked online has opened up new revenue opportunities. Many large publishers outsource their reprint efforts, relying on marketing companies to assume the task of extracting the maximum value

AARP Manages Godzilla-Sized Print Runs with a Few Twists
August 1, 2004

Managing a magazine print run of 22 million isn't a job for the faint of heart. Toss in a bunch of versions tailored to specific geographic markets, demographic segments and ink-jet messages, and things can get downright daunting. The print-production staff at AARP must have thick skin. They produce AARP The Magazine, and the above scenario is part of their routine. "[Having three versions of AARP The Magazine] means closing three different magazines … often with different advertising and edit pages …, three sets of instructions to the printer, and three press and bindery runs," says John Condit, general manager of AARP Publications.

Publishing Gets Personal
June 1, 2004

Political magazine Reason took personalized publishing to a new height with its June 2004 issue. The magazine sent a unique front cover to each of its 40,000 readers. And, it didn't just personalize the covers using readers' names. Each cover featured a satellite-based picture showing the subscriber's residence pinpointed within his or her neighborhood. The issue's editorial focuses on privacy and the amount of publicly available personal information about consumers. It also contains a two-page advertisement that includes U.S. Census data from the subscriber's neighborhood and the voting record of the subscriber's congressional representative. Reason's bold foray into variable data printing, where data or

Markzware Lands Flightcheck Professional 5.0
February 1, 2004

We talked to three of Markzware's top beta testers about the new Mac OS X compatible release of this popular pre- and post-flight tool. The say the GUI's still geeky, but the Mac OS X support and buffed-up feature set make this PDF validation tool a must-have upgrade. Markzware Software recently launched its long-awaited and much heralded FlightCheck Professional 5.0. The latest generation of the company's flagship quality-assurance software for digital publishers offers a host of desirable features aimed at graphic arts and printing professionals. Topping the list is Mac OS X compatibility, perhaps the feature Macintosh users covet most today. Also new:

Printing the Whole Nine Yards
December 1, 2003

When it comes to filling a stadium with excited fans, football teams have to do more than win games. New York's Buffalo Bills are no exception. With a stadium seating 73,000 fans, the Bills organization's marketing team works ceaselessly behind the scenes to promote ticket sales. And the work doesn't stop when the seats are full. Keeping fans up to date with the latest team information and promotions even while they're enjoying a game helps ensure they'll come back for another. Communicating on such a large and regular scale requires the football team's marketing organization to manage extremely long and involved paper trails, and

Beyond Preflight
August 1, 2003

Just over a decade ago, CTP (computer-to-plate) and direct-to-press digital printing began to alter the playing field for the print and publishing industries. Since then, the majority of printers have successfully completed the transition from film to digital file exchange. But with that shift came new dilemmas. For example, on which types of digital files should the print workflow be based? Who should be responsible for creating these final exchange formats—the content creator, a prepress vendor, or the printer? And what tools and best practices should be put in place to ensure file integrity and a job's success? Great strides have been made by

Proof of Concept
May 1, 2003

Nowhere is the adage "time is money" more appropriate than when applied to the business of publishing. Publishers and printers are always on the lookout for faster, better, cheaper ways to speed the production workflow. Widely adopted technologies such as word processing, desktop publishing, digital photography and editing, accredited file formats, electronic file transfer, content management, and zero-make-ready presses all exist for one fundamental reason: to speed publishing production. Of all the points along the publishing workflow, one area remains doggedly resistant to time optimization: proofing. Publishing costs creep upward with every tick of the second hand as pages are being trafficked and proofed.

Workflow on Parade
May 1, 2003

Ken Kingston, production manager for Parade magazine, remembers one defining moment in his move to an all digital workflow. That's when he had what he calls "a gut check." It hit him when officials from his new workflow software provider, Dalim Software, told him they had never integrated their software with an IBM AS/400. The problem: The AS/400 is Parade's computer platform of choice. Kingston swallowed hard. "The Dalim [Software] people calmly said they would work it out," Kingston says. "It took me a second [to recover], but I was okay with that. There were lots of issues we were going to have to