Xinet

Ad Transmission and Preflighting Made Faster and Error-Free
August 1, 2006

The PDF/X-1a specification promised to resolve the kinks in the advertising workflow for print publications. But how widespread has its adoption been, and how are agencies supplying the file format to their print partners? Publishing Executive spoke with J.D. Michaels, vice president and director of print services for New York-based BBDO—the fourth largest global agency network, with 290 offices in 77 countries—about his thoughts on PDF/X-1a, the agency’s efforts to see the PDF prophecy fulfilled, and how the Web has changed the prepress model. Publishing Executive: What are your general responsibilities in your role at BBDO? J.D. Michaels: I am responsible for all production after an idea

DAM Simple Imaging
August 1, 2003

While the Internet has made personal and business communications faster, it's also made life more complicated for publishers, catalogers, magazines, ad agencies, and corporate graphics departments. With everyone from Web designers to CEOs to printers requiring images in different formats for different purposes, corporate publishers are finding it hard to enforce company and brand identities. Logos and other brand images featured on letterheads and envelopes should match those used on signage, magazine ads, the Web, HTML e-mails, presentations, billboards, other printed materials, and television. Usually, this requires organizations to manage dozens of digital graphic files for each corporate logo or brand image. Every logo,

DAM Simple Imaging
August 1, 2003

While the Internet has made personal and business communications faster, it's also made life more complicated for publishers, catalogers, magazines, ad agencies, and corporate graphics departments. With everyone from Web designers to CEOs to printers requiring images in different formats for different purposes, corporate publishers are finding it hard to enforce company and brand identities. Logos and other brand images featured on letterheads and envelopes should match those used on signage, magazine ads, the Web, HTML e-mails, presentations, billboards, other printed materials, and television. Usually, this requires organizations to manage dozens of digital graphic files for each corporate logo or brand image. Every logo,

At Your Service
May 1, 2003

Printers don't just put ink on paper anymore. From design consulting and pre-press before the print job, to mailing and fulfillment after a publication is built, printers are evolving into one stop shops. It's the strategy of choice for leading printers facing evolving technology, expanding customer requirements, and the raw economics of a tough market. But are publishers well-served by this trend? It was inevitable, perhaps, that printers would add services beyond applying ink to paper. Technological advances continue to render certain craft skills obsolete, or less important. At the same time, many publishers want to streamline operations by focusing on core business processes.

Ready Set Connect
August 24, 2001

Since digital files replaced film, file sharing stepped into the spotlight. Many networking solutions provide a keen infrastructure for exchanging files within a publishing company or print shop when the process is often complicated by platform variation and slow transmission time. The following companies provide forms of cross platform, digital connectivity and file compression solutions. If you would like more information, read PrintMedia magazine every July when the editors publish a special Digital Workflow issue. Cross Platform Solutions ADIC: www.adic.com Connectix: www.connectix.com DataViz: INSERT LINK TEXT Intergraph Computer Systems: www.intergraph.com Miramar Systems: www.miramarsys.com Network Technologies: www.networktechinc.com Océ Printing Systems USA: <a

Defending the ASP
July 27, 2001

On July 6, 2001, the editors of PrintMedia InBox interviewed Xinet CEO Scott Seebass about ASPs in "UnScripted." In response, the following Q & A features printChannel's CEO Oliver Pflug. PrintMedia InBox: How do the mergers and acquisitions within the ASP market affect the broader mission of the model? Oliver Pflug: I think what's going on in the market place helps the ASP model. It has to do with the notion of scale. The ASP model assumes that you have a lot of customers running on the same hardware and software. The current acquisitions help concentrate market demand with fewer suppliers becoming more viable.

Unscripted
July 6, 2001

There is discontent in the land of content management, at least in the realm of file transfer services. Last week, WAM!NET cut 130 jobs and Printable bought out Collabria. Mergers and acquisitions within the sector have raised a few eyebrows and suspicions that management services may not be delivering what they had once touted. Whether its a question of inconsistent pricing structures or even mismanaged infrastructure, the graphics arts community is speaking out. This week, Scott Seebass sat down with PrintMedia InBox to set the record straight about ASPs, file transfer and the future of online business models. Seebass is CEO and chief engineer

E-Content Solutions
July 1, 2001

E-Content Solutions is broken down into several categories featuring company descriptions and Web sites, including Digital Asset Management, PDF Worflow Tools, Web & Cross-Media Publishing, Web-Based Project Managment and Catalog Production Solutions. DIGITAL ASSET MANAGEMENT: Applied Graphics Technologies (AGT): www.agt.com AGT provides advanced digital image management services, including the Digital Link System, an integrated suite of software applications to capture, store and retrieve content. Artesia Technologies: www.artesia.com Artesia's TEAMS digital asset management solution drives e-business and cross-media output. It is an open, scalable solution designed to fulfill the requirements of information-intensive businesses. Ascential Software: www.ascentialsoftware.com Ascential Media360

Those Who Can...
March 16, 2001

Some of them came for the vendors. Others of them came to learn from the best in the business. At this week's MagazineTech 2001, publishing and production members from the magazine, catalog and Internet markets came to New York to learn how to make business better. Whether they attended new software demonstrations or took notes about file formats of the future, participants at this year's expo were educated by leading professionals who know the ingredients for success. In one such session, "Sealing the Deal," William Lufkin, founder of consulting firm Lufkin Strategic Procurement, preached about paper and print procurement. He explained that in order