Publishing Executive July-August 2013

 

Branded Content Publishing Highlighted at 2013 Content Strategy Exchange

The Custom Content Council (CCC) held its 2013 Content Strategy Exchange in New York City on July 17, bringing together innovators and thought leaders in custom publishing and branded content. With an emphasis on networking and the exchange of ideas, attendees had a chance to interact with colleagues who are overseeing a range of B2B and B2C campaigns.


Des Moines Is Fertile Ground for Publishing

David Byrne of Talking Heads fame recently passed through Des Moines, Iowa for the 80/35 Music Festival. He wrote about his time there-the bucolic setting, the public spaces, restaurants, the library, and a visit to the local bike shop. "Life here seems to be more or less middle class (the middle class doesn't seem to have been gutted here as it has been in many other towns), and there are amenities like the riverfront, bike trail networks, ball fields, and water sports that show that the city cares about its citizens," Byrne opines in his blog.


Having words

Everything we create at Publishing Executive -- the magazine, newsletter, webinars, conferences -- at heart, is all about the content. At a more essential level, it's about the words we use to convey our message to you, the choices we make as to how we communicate. Words, thoughts, sentences -- all combine to provide quality content.


Homegrown Headlines

In an industry dominated by big name publishers, much of today's media is focused around the happenings in big cities.  Locations such as New York City, Los Angeles and Chicago receive much more national and regional coverage than smaller communities.  And that is not necessarily a bad thing: it makes sense that metropolitan cities would be covered more as they have larger markets and populations.  But what about the smaller communities?  How do the smaller cities, towns, boroughs and neighborhoods receive media coverage, outside of local newspapers?  That's where hyperlocal publications come in.


Infinity & Beyond: Magazines Expand Their Brands

While the E vs. P debate rages on (often in these very pages!), we know there's more to a magazine than what's contained in its pages, be they inked or digitized. The brand is the thing, and defining, building and expanding a magazine's brand is now the crucial task of publishers everywhere. Last month Harper's Bazaar's VP/publisher Carol Smith talked to Publishing Executive about her magazine's move into e-commerce.  This month Elisa Ludwig explores some other magazine moves into supplementary media.


Rethinking Newsstand Sales: Magazines, Money and Mobile Blinders

David Carey, president of Hearst Magazines, believes that people crave "spontaneous combustion" from their media purchases. "We live in this on-demand world," Carey elaborates. "There's nothing more satisfying than going to the newsstand, [browsing] by a subject area that you're passionate about, and you literally own it right then. You take it home, and you get to devour it."

 


Saturday Evening Post and Panna Magazine

A look at what publishers are launching in mobile apps. This issue highlights apps by Saturday Evening Post and Panna Magazine.


The New Non-Obsolescence of the Written Word

A book that I read a few years ago has been popping back into and around my head lately, as I continue my pursuit of the future of reading and the future of our publishing business. The Swerve, by Stephen Greenblatt, is a great read for anyone, but especially for those in our business who like words and reading (in other words, all of us!).


What We Have Learned So Far

The notion of Quartz, like all good ideas, is really a simple one: There is a burgeoning group of global business professionals who are starved for time and insight and who are vociferous adopters of mobile devices and the open, social web. Our approach to this audience is to serve them with a new, global perspective on important developments that impact their businesses delivered on devices they hold close at hand, in a speedy and seamless way and in a "language" they understand and appreciate.