James Bennet

Last week, the feminist Internet exploded with censure for the British quarterly Port Magazine. The magazine’s transgression? Publishing a cover story about “A New Golden Age” of print media and featuring six white, male editors. It provided visual evidence for what many of us in journalism know to be true: The editors-in-chief of the so-called “thought-leader” publications overwhelmingly have been, and remain, white dudes.

But on second glance, something else stuck out. While five out of six of those editors edit general interest publications, a men’s magazine, GQ, was included.

Larry Hackett, Managing Editor of People, was elected president of the American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME) at the annual meeting of the organization on Tuesday, April 20, 2010.

Back in the 1990s, before blogs, Twitter and a host of upstart Web sites transformed online debate into a raucous convention anyone could gate crash, David G. Bradley decided to build a media company around the "influentials" market. The guiding notion was that opinion leaders—people who formulate, shape and promulgate important ideas—rather than gatekeepers or copyright owners, were the true heirs to the digital kingdom, and that a lucrative consumer market could be constituted by those charged with putting good ideas into action.

More Blogs