Content Strategy

History Revisited
February 2, 2001

Assuming that history repeats itself, it stands to reason that yesterday's news matters, and that it may facilitate a far greater understanding of today's society. As the result, both The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal are going digital in order to better manage their long-time assets. Up until now, if someone wanted to research news from as far back as the 1800s, the process was limited to manual and microfilm sifting, two considerably archaic methods of content retrieval in the age of the World Wide Web. In order to step-up usability, both notable publications have had to make two important considerations:

A Win-Win Situation
January 5, 2001

The greeting card business wins big on Mothers' Day. Telephone companies get busy over Christmas. Candy stores count their collateral on Halloween. But for newspapers, election night is one of the most important and most challenging evenings of the year to cover. Not surprisingly, Election 2000 was no exception. In retrospect, the recent Presidential election coverage has been criticized for being both preemptive and often chaotic. Amid the flurry of spin, a newspaper publisher ideally wants to gain temporal advantage over competitors by reporting as accurately as possible given the sometimes unexpected curve balls, as seen specifically with the prolonged Florida "Indecision 2000." While

For Keeps?A Digital Asset Management To-do List
December 15, 2000

The Quark file is missing, your advertiser's asking which format to send, and your publisher just informed you that the anniversary issue is due tomorrow. Do you search haphazardly through old file cabinets looking for reusable scans? Or do you subscribe to a better form of asset management before the proverbial waste hits the cooling device? Like Dickens' ghosts, experts recently delivered testament about DAM's past, present and future. During a Women in Production luncheon, several speakers explained the do's and don'ts of DAM. The following is a checklist of some unofficial rules for the digital road: Think Long term. Determine your needs,

One-Stop Swapping
September 1, 2000

Sears talks shop about its customized, unified solution for asset management and image replacement. Quick: Name a product that you can't get from Sears, Roebuck and Co. Need a minute to think of one? That's not surprising. The Hoffman Estates, IL-based mega-retailer aims to create a one-stop shopping environment, offering everything from appliances, apparel and automotive goods to tools, toys and high-tech merchandise. Not bad for a company founded simply to sell watches. Of course, people can't buy all of these commodities unless they know they're available. To that end, Sears utilizes the standard vehicles for marketing and promotion, including print. Enter the company's

Automating Production and Scripting Technologies
September 1, 2000

Regardless of whether you're in business to manufacture magazines, ads or saucepans, any tool that can automatically manage or execute repetitive actions should be carefully considered and evaluated. Just look how personal banking applications like Intuit's Quicken or Microsoft's Money save us time in organizing run-of-the-mill banking transactions by managing the process for us. Both are examples of great tools that manage a time-consuming, mundane process. Automating production In the production environment, unavoidable tasks manifest in the form of repetitive, lengthy processes we perform every day and sometimes every hour. If these tasks could be removed from the equation, workflow and cycle time would benefit enormously,

Just Their Type
September 1, 2000

McCann-Erickson New York gets creative with Web-based typographic asset management. For many ad agencies, the World Wide Web has been a cash cow, thanks to the revenue gush generated from dot-com clients in 1999 and 2000. However, the savviest agencies aren't just milking Internet start-ups, they're capitalizing on Web-based technologies to improve their own operations. So, even if billings from dot-com campaigns dry up, forward-thinking advertising firms will continue to pump the Web for increased productivity and profits. McCann-Erickson is one agency that's making the most of online opportunities. Presently, McCann-Erickson's New York City office employs the Web as a creative resource and workflow

The New Media's XML
November 1, 1999

Three-letter language delivers data down the superhighway For Congressional Quarterly (CQ), a Washington, DC-based legislative publisher, revamping its online information service called for "addressing the issue every publisher is actively grappling with, which is, how to best manage their content," according to Kinsey Wilson, editor of CQ's Daily News, a congressional news publication. In the new Rather than exclusively relying on print, CQ has turned to the Internet as a new medium for the purveyance of information. Since its conception ten years ago, one of CQ's sites, www.oncongress.cq.com, has continued to evolve, utilizing state-of-the-art Web technologies. According to Wilson, a year-long development

Demystifying the Database Project
September 1, 1999

Databases Help Publishers Get a Grip on Content. Two years ago, Joi Davidson moved into the position of production coordinator for the Chief Executives Organization's (CEO), Bethesda, MD, annual membership directory. She inherited a database publishing legacy; but with the current pace of technology upgrades, a legacy is not always a blessing. During the year-long process of producing the directory—which includes images and contact information for 1,800 members—the association realized its need to make some changes to the system. The first to go was the database application. The association took advantage of a geographic move to update the software to FileMakerPro from FileMaker,

The DAM Revolution Heats Up
August 1, 1999

In all business segments, trends and fads come and go with the seasons. Once in a while, however, a trend becomes a paradigm shift and has such an enormous impact on our business that it makes everyone stop dead in their tracks. Digital Asset Management (DAM) is a shift of this caliber: a trend that is on the verge of exploding into a revolution. Regardless of who you are and what you do in the cycle of brand development or management, you cannot hide from DAM's effect. This one development is going to change the way you think and work. The challenge you'll face is