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President, The Precision Media Group

Media Vent

By Bob Sacks

About Bob

Bob Sacks (aka BoSacks) is a printing/publishing industry consultant and president of The Precision Media Group (BoSacks.com). He is also the co-founder of the research company Media-Ideas (Media-Ideas.net), and publisher and editor of a daily international e-newsletter, Heard on the Web. Sacks has held posts as director of manufacturing and distribution, senior sales manager (paper), chief of operations, pressman, circulator and almost every other job this industry has to offer.

 

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The New, Simple, Easy, Fool-proof Method for Any Magazine’s Success

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For some reason, the latest mantra in the print world is that we have been saved and proven to be forceful and relevant by the success of one title. I actually love the magazine and look forward to getting it each month.  But I am so sick of hearing about the salvation of the magazine industry based on the success of The Food Network Magazine that I am today, here and now, drawing a line in the sand.

Here, my friends, is a simple, absolutely fool-proof formula for starting any successful magazine:

Step 1: Have a successful TV show for 20 years.

Step 2: Make sure that this successful TV show has plenty of variety in both topics and stars

      Sub Step 2a: The show must have plenty of celebrities.  (Creating the long-term celebrity status on the show is more than permissible; it is preferable.)

Step 3: Wait 20 years for proof of concept and a mass audience.

Step 4: (This is the easy step.)  Produce a wildly successful magazine based on the wildly successful TV show.

Step 5: Claim that this new, simple and easy approach to printed products is the foundation of the success of the magazine industry.

Step 6: Repeat as necessary. Create another wildly successful TV show and go back to Step 2

If you follow these ultra-simple Bo-Steps to magazine success, you will be considered a veritable media genius.
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COMMENTS

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Most Recent Comments:
Noelle Skodzinski - Posted on July 08, 2010
Bob, you make an interesting point. I don't disagree that it doesn't represent the salvation of the magazine industry, but The Food Network Magazine also has done some great things that can certainly apply to other magazines, and stress the importance of building an audience and multiplatform content. (Yes, celebrities and a hugely successful TV show certainly help, of course.) But, it's still print ... and people (lots of them) are PAYING for PRINT content.
Dr Joe Webb - Posted on July 08, 2010
Samir: Bob was telling a joke about Oprah. I read about her in a magazine....
Samir Husni - Posted on July 08, 2010
Dear Bob
You can't just flat admit that there is still a lot of success stories in the print magazine world. The Food Network magazine is but one of hundreds of thriving printed magazines... I know you love every thing digital, but please don't let that blind your good judgment. Take care my friend and all the best
Samir
BTW, anytime we use that "but" after any statement it negates all the aforementioned....
Click here to view archived comments...
Archived Comments:
Noelle Skodzinski - Posted on July 08, 2010
Bob, you make an interesting point. I don't disagree that it doesn't represent the salvation of the magazine industry, but The Food Network Magazine also has done some great things that can certainly apply to other magazines, and stress the importance of building an audience and multiplatform content. (Yes, celebrities and a hugely successful TV show certainly help, of course.) But, it's still print ... and people (lots of them) are PAYING for PRINT content.
Dr Joe Webb - Posted on July 08, 2010
Samir: Bob was telling a joke about Oprah. I read about her in a magazine....
Samir Husni - Posted on July 08, 2010
Dear Bob
You can't just flat admit that there is still a lot of success stories in the print magazine world. The Food Network magazine is but one of hundreds of thriving printed magazines... I know you love every thing digital, but please don't let that blind your good judgment. Take care my friend and all the best
Samir
BTW, anytime we use that "but" after any statement it negates all the aforementioned....